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MINNESOTA DNR NEWS #59                                                                               Aug. 5, 2013
All news releases are available in the DNR’s website newsroom at www.mndnr.gov/news.
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IN THIS ISSUE
Application deadline approaching for 2013 Camp Ripley archery hunts
Question of the week: algae 

DNR NEWS – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Application deadline approaching for 2013 Camp Ripley archery hunts

Hunters interested in the 2013 regular archery deer hunts at Camp Ripley near Little Falls are reminded that this year’s Aug. 16 application deadline is fast approaching, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) said.

Because of military training needs, the dates for this year’s hunts are being held about a week later than usual.

Hunters may pick from only one of two hunting seasons, Oct. 26-27 (Sat.-Sun., code 668) or
Nov. 2-3 (Sat.-Sun., code 669). A total of 5,000 permits, 2,500 per two-day hunt, will be made available. Successful applicants must purchase a valid archery license at least two days before their hunt to participate. The bag limit is two, and bonus permits may be used to take antlerless deer. Rules and instructions for this year’s hunt can be found on DNR’s deer hunting Web page.

Hunters may choose from four options to apply for the Camp Ripley archery hunts:

  • Through the DNR’s computerized electronic licensing system (ELS) at any one of 1,500 ELS agents located throughout Minnesota.
  • By telephone at 888-665-4236.
  • Through the DNR’s Internet licensing link at www.dnr.state.mn.us/licenses/index.html.
  • At the DNR License Center, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul.

The application fee for the hunt is $12 per applicant. Those who apply by phone or Internet will be charged an additional convenience fee of 3 percent ($0.36) per transaction.

To apply, resident hunters 21 and older must provide a valid state driver’s license or public safety identification number. Residents under 21 may also provide a DNR firearms safety training number to apply. Nonresident hunters must apply using a valid driver’s license number, public safety identification number, or MDNR customer number from a recent Minnesota hunting or fishing license.

All applicants must be at least 10 years old prior to the hunt they apply for. In addition, anyone born on or after Jan. 1, 1980, must have a firearms safety certificate or other evidence of successfully completing a hunter safety course to obtain a license to hunt or trap in Minnesota.

Hunters may apply as individuals or as a group, up to four individuals. Group members may only apply for the same two-day season. The first group applicant must specify “Create New Group” when asked, and will receive a group number. Subsequent group applicants must specify they want to “Join an Existing Group” and must use the same group number supplied to the first group applicant.
         
The archery hunt at Camp Ripley is an annual event. The DNR coordinates the hunt with the Department of Military Affairs, which manages the 53,000-acre military reservation.

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DNR QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Q: What causes many lakes, rivers and ponds to turn green by mid-summer? Some even have an odor.

A: By mid-summer many waterbodies turn green due to the growth of small microscopic plants in the water called algae. Algae grow in all bodies of water when light and nutrients levels are sufficient.

In many lakes, algae abundance is determined by the amount of phosphorus dissolved in the water. The more phosphorus present, the more abundant algae become and the greener the water gets.

There are many different types of algae. During mid-summer one particular group of algae, called blue-green algae, are often particularly abundant. When this algal group becomes abundant, a strong musty or earthy odor many occur. Algae that have died and are decomposing cause the odor. Because algae abundance strongly depends on the amount of phosphorus available, the best long-term strategy is to improve land-use practices to prevent phosphorus and other nutrients from getting into our lakes and ponds.

- Dave Wright, DNR lakes and rivers unit supervisor


This email was sent to editor@woodsnews.com on behalf of: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources · 500 Lafayette Road · Saint Paul, MN 55155 · 1-888-MINNDNR  

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